Lake Forest Park

Latest Staff Picks

No detail is superfluous in this portrait of a small forest town and the young hockey team that feels the weight of its collective hopes and fears. Love and loyalty to place, friends, and family are tested when a rift opens in the community. Even those who would stay out of the fight unwittingly take sides.

Picked by Emily A.

A young artist leaves Dublin, depressed and adrift in her own thoughts, ruminating on the meaning and purpose of art. Her grandmother's empty cottage provides a sanctuary, where she explores her surroundings on foot and by bicycle. Suffused with beautiful imagery, this quiet character study lived up to all of my hopes. 

Picked by Emily A.

"Not a novel, not a memoir, not a lyric" — whatever this book is, it's a fiercely intelligent and sharply funny exploration of a woman's emotional and intellectual development that will have you running to keep up.

Picked by Stephen

Hortensia and Marion neighbor in animosity in Capetown,South Africa. Both women have had successful careers in design and architecture and are now old. However sharp her tongue and intolerant of Marion's "stupidity", Hortensia unexpectedly needs Marion to skirt the issue of having a strange caregiver in her home. The women find common ground in recent widowhood and revelation of their husbands' secrets. The real surprise for each of them becomes friendship and understanding!

Picked by Jane

The Russian Revolution is one of the defining events of modern history, and sci-fi author China Miéville has turned its tumultuous, hopeful, and ultimately tragic build-up into a thrilling and fascinating page-turner.

Picked by Stephen

It's Annie meets Lord of the Flies in this haunting story of a young orphan girl who becomes alienated from the other girls in her foster home. While it is a quick read, it is terrifyingly memorable and beautifully translated, and every sentence is truly worth the price.   

Picked by Kalani

What makes a masterpiece? In a career as prolific, eclectic and adventurous as Percival Everett's, his body of work the very definition of singularity, it may even be foolish to hint one book is superior to another. And while it might be brazen to assert So Much Blue may be that magnum opus, it is an accusation i gleefully declare. A blissfully precise pen firmly draws the reader into the life of Kevin Pace in his quest for absolution and closure and the novel's three timelines kept deftly aloft by Everett's signature humor and nuanced storytelling.

Picked by Wesley

A heartbreaking look at the struggle of undocumented migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexican border. Drawing on stories she heard as a volunteer interpreter, Luiselli reveals the suffering and exploitation at the heart of an arbitrarily cruel border policy.

Picked by Stephen

This is the novel I wanted The Girls to be. What Buntin's novel lacks in flair and fanaticism it makes up for in its shrewd and sympathetic examination of the arrogance and exaggerated angst that makes adolescence such an electrifying study.

Picked by Wesley