Staff Picks by Tag

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The Art of Running: Learning to Run Like a Greek By Andrea Marcolongo, Will Schutt (Translator) Cover Image
By Andrea Marcolongo, Will Schutt (Translator)
$18.00
ISBN: 9798889660330
Availability: On our shelves now at one or more of our stores
Published: Europa Compass - April 2nd, 2024

A runner and a classical scholar, Marcolongo intertwines ancient history with personal memoir as she emotionally and physically prepares herself to run from Marathon to Athens. This book felt delightfully like if What I Talk about When I Talk about Running and Good for a Girl had a baby, and then that baby studied sport and wit directly from the great classic philosophers herself. Excellently written, and a must-read for runners who are also musers.


Review by Jess

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Nero: Matricide, Music, and Murder in Imperial Rome By Anthony Everitt, Roddy Ashworth Cover Image
$22.00
ISBN: 9780593133217
Availability: On our shelves now at one or more of our stores
Published: Random House Trade Paperbacks - November 14th, 2023

An interesting and quite nuanced reappraisal of Nero's reign as emperor, this history reads much like a novel. Turns out that historians of Nero's time despised him, which screwed over his position in history. However, Everitt shows us that there's much more to this story than we've been led to believe.


Review by Zack

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A Thousand Ships: A Novel By Natalie Haynes Cover Image
$27.99
Unavailable at this time.
ISBN: 9780063065390
Published: Harper - January 26th, 2021

“A war does not ignore half the people whose lives it touches. So why do we?”

So says Calliope, muse of epic poetry. The poet calls on her for inspiration, and in this version, she will insist he tell the stories of the women of Greece and Troy, women who were always influential in the original saga, even if from the margins.

In this retelling of the Trojan War, Natalie Haynes crafts a nonlinear narrative, weaving together the myths of queens, oracles, daughters, wives, and goddesses. I found myself tossed about from one woman’s story to another, as if on Homer’s wine-dark sea.